New York State Puts Light for Darkness and ‘Celebrates’ Death

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The Reproductive Health Act allows for full-term abortions and greatly reduces safeguards of those seeking abortions and the care—and lack thereof—of the babies themselves.

At the bottom of the World Trade Center complex, at its 9/11 memorial, the lives of thousands are remembered.

However, not everyone memorialized was yet born.

Newsday tells the story of Diane Singer and her unborn child:

Dianne T. Signer was five days away from her wedding in Freeport and six months away from the birth of her first child when she died in the World Trade Center terrorist attacks of 9/11…

Signer’s is one of 11 pregnancies acknowledged among the nearly 3,000 names inscribed in bronze around the footprints of the Twin Towers.

Then, this week, Mayor Cuomo of New York tweeted about something at the top of that new World Trade Center, gleefully exclaiming:

The #ReproductiveHealthAct is now law in New York State. We lit the spire pink to celebrate.

“Celebrate.”

Don’t miss it.

Woe

Isaiah, perhaps, put it best:

“Woe to those who call evil good and good evil, who put darkness for light and light for darkness” (Isaiah 5:20).

Over the past few days I’ve read and prayed quite a bit about the now-law of New York State that allows for full-term abortions and greatly reduces safeguards of those seeking abortions and the care—and lack thereof—of the babies themselves.

I don’t use this term—“babies”—lightly. Some today defend the idea that babies are only people after they are born; others claim that it is only when someone has a sense of self-awareness when he or she becomes a person.

Let me be clear: in the culture in which we live, there is much I write about, and in that writing I contain my disdain for a number of reasons, tempering my words for a greater goal of further influence and conversation.

But here I can only shake my head at the sheer darkness …

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