Missional Fatigue: Fuel for When We’re Running on Empty

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Sometimes how you’re resting is more important than what you’re doing.

Growing up, my family would often travel to a small, beach-side town in Kwazulu-Natal (South Africa) called Zinkwazi to visit my Grandparents during the school holidays. I distinctly remember one particular day visiting friends at their dairy farm, being amazed with the vibrant green grass on their field, in contrast to the dull sugar cane in the farm next door! As we went on a tour of the dairy process, our farmer-friend turned wise-Yoda informed us that he is not, in fact, a dairy farmer but a grass grower. In seeing our confused expressions, he continued on to explain himself: “The key to great milk”, he said, “is great grass. The better the quality of our grass, the more nutritious it is for our cows, and the milk quality increases.” Now I’m not a farmer, but this is an important philosophical concept for Christian living that I have come to hold onto.

Evangelistically speaking, COVID-19 may have used more of your fuel than you anticipated, and you may be finding yourself wearied with the pressures, problems, and pain of this time. Tiredness and discouragement may have crept in and clouded our vision of God’s heart for the lost. How can we spur each other on, and increase personal evangelistic health when we’re running on empty?

We have to be honest and admit that we can, at times, live spiritually detached from the urgency of Christ’s heart for the lost. At times, we lack the desperation to see the people across the street and around the world come to know and follow Jesus. Many of us can be more intentional with our diets than living as an evangelistic influence where we live, work, and play.

In Colossians 4:2-4, the Apostle Paul provides some direction and encouragement …

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